Biometric Technology

  • Biometrics in Government - Addressing Vendor Lock-in

Addressing Vendor Lock-In in ABIS Systems | White Paper

“Vendor lock-in” is a term that describes when a technology vendor imposes switching costs upon their customer—intentionally or otherwise—to make it unattractive for them to replace their installed products. It’s done by designing and deploying a system in such a way that makes it exceedingly difficult, risky, or expensive to replace part or all of the system. The effect is that the vendor can earn a virtual monopoly within that account on future product and service revenue. The phenomenon is universal, but vendor lock-in has occurred in the biometrics realm, typically involving deployment of an AFIS/ABIS (automated fingerprint/biometric identification [...]

  • Liveness Detection in Biometrics

Liveness detection in biometrics is essential for mobile authentication and onboarding

Mobile biometrics offer banks and other businesses a way to more effectively verify the identities of their new and existing customers. Mobile onboarding allows a prospective banking customer to open an account without visiting a branch. Biometrics make this identity proofing process more robust and secure. New customers can then use their biometrics in place of passwords for more secure and convenient mobile authentication. Facial recognition is a particularly useful biometric modality for mobile onboarding and authentication: ● Nearly all mobile devices have built-in cameras that support it. ● The user experience of capturing a “selfie” is exceptionally intuitive and [...]

  • Mobile Biometric Authentication

White Paper   |   Mobile Biometric Authentication: Device-centric vs. server-centric architecture

Multiple biometric modalities for authentication can achieve higher biometric performance. Introduction: Biometrics use “inherent” factors (something the user is) to authenticate a user’s identity. Relative to knowledge- and possession-based authentication methods (something the user knows and something the user has), inherent authentication factors like biometrics are difficult to steal and spoof. We can’t easily tell when a fraudster uses a stolen password or mobile device, but with biometrics and liveness detection we can better detect when a fraudster is at work so that their access can be prevented.

  • Future of Authentication eBook

Mobile biometric authentication: A password-free future comes into focus

Introduction If you looked into your Magic 8-Ball and asked, “Will I ever be able to stop using passwords for authentication?” it would certainly reply: “Outlook good.” And the outlook is good considering biometrics are making authentication simpler and more secure than ever. Passwords have never looked so retro. But if you asked us the same question, we would say you don’t need a Magic 8-Ball to know that the future of authentication is already here. Download PDF here if you are having trouble viewing. https://www.aware.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/eBook_Mobile-Biometric-Authentication-Password-Free-Future_EMAIL.pdf Facial Recognition When rumors were first heard that Apple’s iPhone X [...]

  • Multimodal Mobile Biometrics

Mobile biometric authentication: Multimodal approaches for improved matching and spoof detection

The Future of Mobile Authentication: Multimodal Biometrics - The vast majority of modern authentication implementations strive to maximize both security and convenience; that is, to: - Make it as difficult as possible for a fraudster to steal or spoof the rightful user’s authentication factors (e.g. device, password, token, biometric). - Avoid interference with access to the protected asset or service for the rightful user. - Dissuade the user from circumventing the intended security mechanisms.

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